A butterfly garden grows at Art Prize

 

AP 2017 Illustration

“People will come and see that a part of them is there. Patients can feel part of something bigger – instead of just going in for chemo.” — Zahrah Resh

Now I know how a caterpillar feels: I went for a visit with my oncologist and emerged a butterfly.

In Art Prize. Really.

Unexpected defines everything about cancer. This was one of the uppers.

With luck, it will be for some 6,500 of us, but I’m getting ahead of myself.

Having resumed normal breathing after a regular 6-month visit with my oncologist at Cancer and Hematology Centers of Western Michigan in Spectrum Health’s Lemmen-Holton Cancer Pavilion, I stopped at scheduling to set up my next appointment.

The luck of the draw took me to Chris Ackerman. 

butterflies Chris Ackerman
Chris Ackerman and my butterfly.

Scheduling business done, she pushed two green squares of paper toward me, and told me to write a message of hope to another cancer patient on one of them.  She would use the other to fashion a butterfly.

Say what? 

Never one to do as told without the “why,” I went after that first.

My message would be turned into one of hopefully 6,500 butterflies, Chris explained.

A scheduler for two years at CHCWM, Chris was roaming Art Prize, Grand Rapids’s gia-normous  yearly art show, and got to thinking about the patients she saw daily.

Many of us are too sick to make the trek to the almost 200 venues in Art Prize, and Chris said she suddenly thought, “It’s just another grief — something they’re excluded from.”

She resolved to do something about it.

About the same time, Michigan artist and gallery owner Zahrah Resh, a thyroid cancer survivor treated in Grand Rapids, was looking for an Art Prize venue. 

She talked about it with Dr. Steven J. Dupuis, who specializes in hospice and palliative medicine. He introduced her to Chris.

Hope, Heal, Soar takes off

Resh sent a proposal for her Hope, Heal, Soar project to Chris and Dr. Mark Campbell, a member of the Physician Executive Team at CHCWM, and with support and funding from Cancer and Hematology Centers and approval from Spectrum, the project took off, she said.

Come Art Prize 2017,  September 20-October 8, she will convert the Lemmen-Holton Cancer Pavilion’s lobby into a garden filled with 6,500 butterflies of painted and handmade paper personalized by patients, staff, volunteers, families  and friends of CHCWM and Spectrum Health.

There will be butterfly-making stations during Art Prize, and visitors will be able to make memorial butterflies, Chris said.

“I wanted 6,500 butterflies,” Resh told me. “We have at least 2,500 to go.”

The garden will feature “trees” of dried bamboo about 18 feet high in planters and  “flowers” in the form of parasols she found in San Diego. 

The project is very personal for Resh.

“People will come and see that a part of them is there,” she said. “Patients can feel part of something bigger – instead of just going in for chemo.” 

Through this project, cancer patients will be included in Art Prize, Chris said.

Support takes flight

“I hope when they see the butterflies, they will feel and sense the faith and support around them.”

Mine will be somewhere among the flutter bugs. 

Butterflies - Sue Schroder's
Sister Sue Tracy’s message takes wing on my butterfly.

Its message, “Tears are the safety valve of the heart,” came to me originally through Sister Sue Tracy, my late friend, cancer veteran and long-time oncology chaplain at Spectrum Health.

As I waited for my most recent appointment, I half expected to see her flying through the waiting room at CHCWM as usual, leaving smiles and strength in her wake.

Now I’m thinking she was there after all. I just didn’t see her.